VISA SUPPORT

Schengen C-type visa

The unified Schengen visa (C-type visa valid in Schengen states) entitles the holder to stay in the territory of all Schengen states.

The Schengen visa with limited territorial validity (C-type visa valid only in Poland or with validity excluded for a specified Schengen state/states) only entitles the holder to stay in the territory of the state/states for which it is valid.

National D-type visa

If you intend to stay in the territory of Poland for a total of more than 90 days (at least 91 days) during one or more visits within a half-year period calculated from the date of first entry, you need to apply for a national D-type visa.

The national D-type visa entitles the holder to:
– stay in the territory of Poland throughout the period of its validity;
– additionally move within the territory of other Schengen states for up to three months within a half-year period.

Transit airport visa

If you intend to travel by air from a third state to another third state with a stopover at an airport in the Schengen area (in the territory of the Republic of Poland) and also:
(1) you do not intend to leave the international transit area of the airport and
(2) you hold the citizenship of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Iran, Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sudan or Sri Lanka,
– you need to apply for an A-type airport transit visa.

When planning transit through an airport situated in a Schengen state other than Poland, we advise you to directly contact a consulate of the country concerned for visa information.

The A-type airport transit visa only entitles the holder to stay in the international transit area of the airport (it does not entitle the holder to enter Schengen territory or leave the transit area of the airport).

How long can I spend in the territory of Poland/Schengen with a C- or D-type visa?

The duration of stay for foreign nationals in Poland (holders of national D-type visas) or in Schengen territory (holders of unified C-type visas) is indicated in the visa (“duration of stay” expressed in numbers); a stay of this kind is only possible during the validity of the visa (“visa valid from….to….”).

When planning transit through an airport situated in a Schengen state other than Poland, we advise you to directly contact a consulate of the country concerned for visa information.

The A-type airport transit visa only entitles the holder to stay in the international transit area of the airport (it does not entitle the holder to enter Schengen territory or leave the transit area of the airport).

What documents do you need when submitting a C-type Schengen visa application?

1. Travel document:
– valid at least three months after your planned departure from Poland/Schengen territory;
– with at least 2 blank pages;
– issued within the last ten years.
2. Completed and signed visa application form.
3. Biometric photo.
4. Visa fee.
5. Health insurance of at least EUR 30000, valid in the entire Schengen territory.
6. Supplementary documents, confirming:
– the purpose of the visit,
– possession of accommodation;
– possession of sufficient funds to cover the cost of entry, stay and departure from the Schengen territory or Poland;
– willingness to leave Schengen territory after expiry of the visa.

The types and number of supplementary documents may differ depending on the consular office. In this connection we advise you to contact the relevant consulate to obtain full information concerning the documents needed when submitting a visa application.

What documents do you need when submitting a D-type national visa application?

1. Travel document:
2. Completed and signed visa application form.
3. Biometric photo.
4. Visa fee.
5. Health insurance.
6. Supplementary documents confirming:
– the purpose of the visit,
– possession of sufficient funds to cover the cost of entry, stay and departure from the territory of Poland;
– the necessity of staying in the territory of Poland for more than 90 days within a half-year period.

The types and number of supplementary documents may differ depending on the consular office. In this connection we advise you to contact the relevant consulate to obtain full information concerning the documents needed when submitting a visa application.

The consul of which Schengen state is competent to process your Schengen visa application?

The consul of the Schengen state which is the main destination of your visit is always the consul competent to process your visa application.

If you are not planning to visit Poland at all, you cannot submit your Schengen visa application to a Polish consular office.

If you are going to visit several Schengen states, a Polish consul will be competent to process your application only if Poland is the main destination of your entry into Schengen territory or if Poland is the state in which you intend to spend most of your time.

If you intend to stay in the territory of Poland and/or any other Schengen states (during one or more visits) for a total of up to 90 days within a half-year period calculated from the date of first entry, or if you plan to pass through Schengen territory (by train, car or plane), you need to apply for a Schengen C-type visa.

Citizens of the following countries are not required to be in possession of a visa when entering Poland for less than 90 days:

  • Albania (only for holders of biometric passports)
  • Andorra
  • Antigua Barbuda
  • Argentina
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belgium
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina (only for holders of biometric passports)
  • Brazil
  • Brunei
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Dominica
  • East Timor
  • El Salvador
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Georgia (only for holders of biometric passports)
  • Germany
  • Greece

 

  • Grenada
  • Guatemala
  • Honduras
  • Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region)
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Kiribati
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macao (Special Administrative Region)
  • Macedonia (only for holders of biometric passports)
  • Malaysia
  • Malta
  • Marshall Islands
  • Mauritius
  • Mexico
  • Micronesia
  • Moldova (only for holders of biometric passports)
  • Monaco
  • Montenegro (only for holders of biometric passports)
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • Norway
  • Palau
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Samoa
  • San Marino
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Serbia (only for holders of biometric passports)
  • Seychelles
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Solomon Islands
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • St. Lucia
  • St. Pierre and Miquelon
  • St. Vincent and Grenadines
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Taiwan (for holders of passports which include an identity card number)
  • Tonga
  • Trynidad and Tobago
  • Tuvalu
  • Ukraine (only for holders of biometric passports)
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States of America
  • Uruguay
  • Vanuatu
  • Vatican (Holy See)
  • Venezuela

Remarks:
• The above list does not involve residence, work or any other paid activity (not applicable to citizens of the EU/EEA Member States)
• As of 1 May 2005, citizens of the EU countries are entitled to move freely within the European Union/European Economic Area. For stays exceeding 90, days please check here: Information for EU/EEA citizens traveling to Poland
• For further information concerning entry requirements and residence in Poland, please contact a local Polish embassy or consulate in your country. Check here for addresses of Polish diplomatic and consular posts abroad
• Holders of travel documents issued on the basis of the Geneva Convention of 28 July 1951 on the status of refugees and the New York Convention of 28 September 1954 on the status of stateless persons are not entitled to enter Poland without a visa. Exceptions:
As of 21 May 2005, on the basis of the European Agreement on the Abolition of Visas for Refugees signed at Strasbourg on 20 April 1959, refugees lawfully resident in the territories of Ireland and Romania are exempt from the obligation to obtain visas for entering or leaving the territory of Poland, provided that:

  1. They hold a valid travel document issued in accordance with the Convention on the Status of Refugees of 28 July 1951 or the agreement relating to the issue of a travel document to refugees of 15 October 1946, by authorities of the Contracting Party in whose territory they are lawfully resident
  2. Their visit is of not more than three months’ duration
  3.  A visa is still required for a stay of longer than three months or for the purpose of taking up gainful employment in the territory of another Contracting Party.
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